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4 Tiger Nuts Benefits Sexually

Angela Sheddan

Reviewed by Angela Sheddan, FNP

Written by Rachel Sacks

Published 04/29/2023

Are there any tiger nuts benefits — sexually speaking? Here’s everything you need to know.

What has a nutty flavor but isn’t a nut exactly and might have stripes but isn’t a tiger? The incidentally named tiger nuts are a delicious snack food that may have several health benefits.

Considered edible tubers, tiger nuts are the roots of the African plant yellow nutsedge (or Cyperus esculentus). They’re typically found in Spanish and Mexican cuisine and can be used in several ways, from tiger nut milk to tiger nut flour.

Tiger nuts also have numerous benefits for your health — there may even be some tiger nuts benefits sexually.

We’ll explore whether there are benefits of tiger nuts sexually and how this snack food can be a healthy addition to a balanced diet.

While tiger nuts do contain some essential nutrients that are great for your health — which we’ll cover below — there haven’t been many studies on the direct effects of this particular food on sexual behaviors or sexual disorders.

And while finding out that one food is a magical cure-all for sexual issues — or that could instantly improve your sex life and increase sexual activity — the truth is one food can’t do all that.

But a good diet full of nutritious and varied foods can help boost sexual libido and help your body function properly.

On the other hand, a poor diet can lead to various health conditions, which could negatively impact sexual activity. Erectile dysfunction, for example, is often linked to obesity and diabetes, which can be caused by a poor diet.

Tiger nuts could be a great addition to your diet, as they contain several important nutrients that contribute to overall health and could improve sexual function. Keep reading to learn more about tiger nuts benefits sexually.

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Raw tiger nuts are packed with various nutrients and beneficial plant compounds. One ounce of raw tiger nuts contains :

  • 2 grams of protein

  • 7 grams of fat

  • 19 grams of carbohydrates

  • 10 grams of dietary fiber

There are also high levels of zinc and iron in tiger nuts, both of which provide essential health benefits. Vitamin C and E and fatty acids have been found in ground tiger nuts as well.

May Improve Digestion

Tiger nuts are also a rich source of resistant starch, a type of fiber that feeds the friendly bacteria in your gut, helping your digestion run smoothly.

One small study found that the resistant starch in tiger nut milk drink improved gut microbes in just three days.

Tiger nuts are also a good source of fiber, with high amounts of dietary or insoluble fiber. Insoluble fiber passes through your gut without being digested, adding bulk to your stools and helping food move through your stomach better to reduce the chance of constipation.

The high fiber content of tiger nuts may cause gas or bloating when you first start consuming them, so start with small portions and gradually increase your intake.

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Could Help Reduce Blood Sugar Levels

One reason tiger nuts may help keep blood sugar levels in check is due to the high fiber content of the tubers, which may slow down the absorption of sugar in the gut.

Tiger nuts also contain a high proportion of the amino acid arginine. This essential amino acid may increase insulin production, which could be important for blood sugar management.

May Improve Heart Health

Tiger nuts may help your heart due to their high amount of monounsaturated fats. This gives them a fat profile similar to that of olive oil — which can also help improve heart health.

Diets high in monounsaturated fats are linked to lower levels of bad (LDL) cholesterol and higher levels of good (HDL) cholesterol. This type of fat is also associated with a lower risk of heart disease.

Additionally, research has found that tiger nuts lead to better blood circulation, which can reduce your risk of heart disease.

Could Be a Natural Aphrodisiac

There may be some benefits of tiger nuts sexually — this snack may boost libido.

While tiger nuts are believed to have aphrodisiac properties, few studies have investigated this.

A study on rats found that eating a large number of tiger nuts for 30 days increased testosterone levels, boosted sexual activity and reduced intromission time between mating sessions.

However, a clinical trial in humans using tiger nuts as an aphrodisiac needs to be conducted to fully understand the impact on people.

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Tiger nuts — although not nuts and not striped like a tiger — are edible tuber snacks that provide you with plenty of essential nutrients.

  • Known as a tuber, tiger nuts can be ground into flour or made into tiger nut milk.

  • These tubers contain healthy fats, the mineral zinc and vitamins C and E.

  • Tiger nuts help improve blood flow, control blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of heart disease.

But what are tiger nuts benefits sexually? Unfortunately, research on how tiger nuts improve sexual function in humans is lacking. Still, the other health benefits of tiger nuts can help keep you healthy and potentially reduce sexual dysfunction like erectile dysfunction.

The most effective way to treat erectile dysfunction is through the use of medications like sildenafil (the active ingredient in Viagra®) and others. You can also include various foods as part of a balanced diet to help improve your sexual performance and overall well-being.

If you’re struggling with erectile dysfunction, talk to a healthcare professional to get a diagnosis and treatment plan that’s right for you.

14 Sources

  1. Cyperus esculentus (Chufa Flatsedge, Chufa Sedge, Earth Almond, Tiger Nut, Yellow Nut-grass, Yellow Nutsedge) | North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox. (n.d.). North Carolina Extension Gardener Plant Toolbox. Retrieved from https://plants.ces.ncsu.edu/plants/cyperus-esculentus/
  2. Wolfram, T. (2019, January 6). What are Tiger Nuts? Food & Nutrition Magazine. Retrieved from https://foodandnutrition.org/from-the-magazine/what-are-tiger-nuts/
  3. Symptoms & Causes of Erectile Dysfunction - NIDDK. (n.d.). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Retrieved from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/symptoms-causes
  4. Bado, S., Bazongo, P., Son, G., Kyaw, M. T., Forster, B. P., Nielen, S., Lykke, A. M., Ouédraogo, A., & Bassolé, I. H. (2015). Physicochemical characteristics and composition of three morphotypes ofcyperus esculentustubers and tuber oils. Journal of Analytical Methods in Chemistry, 2015, 1–8. Retrieved from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jamc/2015/673547/
  5. McKinney, C., & LDN, R. (n.d.). What is Resistant Starch? The Johns Hopkins Patient Guide to Diabetes. Retrieved from https://hopkinsdiabetesinfo.org/what-is-resistant-starch/
  6. Selma-Royo, M., García-Mantrana, I., Collado, M. C., & Perez-Martínez, G. (2022). Intake of Natural, Unprocessed Tiger Nuts (Cyperus esculentus L.) Drink Significantly Favors Intestinal Beneficial Bacteria in a Short Period of Time. Nutrients, 14(9). Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9104503/
  7. Yang, J., Wang, P., Zhou, L., & Xu, F. (2012). Effect of dietary fiber on constipation: A meta analysis. World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG, 18(48), 7378-7383. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3544045/
  8. Aremu, Matthew & Bamidele, Titilayo & Hemen, Agere & Ibrahim, Hashim & Aremu, Stephen. (2015). Proximate Composition and Amino Acid Profile of Raw and Cooked Black Variety of Tiger nut (Cyperus esculentus L.) Grown in Northeast Nigeria. Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare. 5, 213- 221. Retrieved from https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Amino-acid-profiles-of-tiger-nut-g-100g-crude-protein_tbl1_316595924
  9. Umeda, M., Hiramoto, M., Watanabe, A., Tsunoda, N., & Imai, T. (2015). Arginine-induced insulin secretion in endoplasmic reticulum. Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications, 466(4), 717-722. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006291X15305234
  10. LeWine, H. E. (2021, November 1). Is extra-virgin olive oil extra healthy? Harvard Health. Retrieved from https://www.health.harvard.edu/nutrition/is-extra-virgin-olive-oil-extra-healthy
  11. Types of Fat | The Nutrition Source | Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (n.d.). Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Retrieved from https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/fats-and-cholesterol/types-of-fat/
  12. Schwingshackl, L., & Hoffmann, G. (2013). Monounsaturated fatty acids, olive oil and health status: A systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies. Lipids in Health and Disease, 13. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4198773/
  13. Ford, H. (2020, October 27). How To Boost Your Circulation (And Why It's Important!). Henry Ford Health. Retrieved from https://www.henryford.com/blog/2020/10/how-to-boost-circulation
  14. Allouh, M. Z., Daradka, H. M., & Abu Ghaida, J. H. (2014). Influence of Cyperus esculentus tubers (Tiger Nut) on male rat copulatory behavior. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579607/
Editorial Standards

Hims & Hers has strict sourcing guidelines to ensure our content is accurate and current. We rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We strive to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references. See a mistake? Let us know at [email protected]!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment. Learn more about our editorial standards here.

Angela Sheddan, FNP

Dr. Angela Sheddan has been a Family Nurse Practitioner since 2005, practicing in community, urgent and retail health capacities. She has also worked in an operational capacity as an educator for clinical operations for retail clinics. 

She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, her master’s from the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, and her Doctor of Nursing Practice from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa. You can find Angela on LinkedIn for more information.


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