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Stendra (Avanafil) Prices & Savings Tips

Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, ALM

Reviewed by Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, ALM

Written by Geoffrey C. Whittaker

Published 09/27/2020

Updated 04/06/2024

If you’re one of the tens of millions of men affected by ED, you may have looked into treatment options, including Stendra®, a relatively new ED medication on the market. 

We offer Stendra as part of our range of erectile dysfunction medications, but before you click to buy, you’re probably curious about what the best Stendra price you can get, and how you can get it.

Below, we explore those questions around the average Stendra price, examining why Stendra is so expensive and offering tips for getting the lowest price. We also share some other options you may consider if you’re looking for a safe, reliable way to treat erectile dysfunction and improve your sexual health.

Choose your chew

Add a boost to your sex life with our new chewable formats

A large part why Stendra, the brand name for avanafil,  is so expensive is that there is not yet a low-cost, generic version of it on the market. Rather, you can only buy the brand name.

Because no generic form of Stendra is available, the price of Stendra is higher than the prices of sildenafil and tadalafil, the generic versions of Viagra® and Cialis®. Generics contain the same active ingredients and provide the same clinical benefits as brand-name drugs, but they are generally available at a fraction of the original medication’s price.

Another reason for avanafil’s price is that most insurance companies will not cover it because they don’t deem it medically necessary. 

Short of purchasing Stendra from an online pharmacy (like those in Canada), you can’t typically get it for much below the market price (and you shouldn’t buy from Canadian pharmacies, for reasons we’ll address shortly). 

The cost of Stendra starts at $59 per use through our online platform for treating ED, though how much you’ll pay elsewhere will differ. A 30-day supply of Stendra could cost close to $2,000, without accounting for the impact of taxes, discounts, coupons or other individual factors, such as the dose of Stendra your healthcare provider prescribes (for example, Stendra 200 mg cost is likely to be higher than the 50 mg cost).

In comparison, you can get sildenafil, the generic form of Viagra,  for as little as $4 per use through our online platform. 

Choose your chew

Add a boost to your sex life with our new chewable formats

While it’s understandable to want to save, it’s important not to cut corners when it comes to medication, as it can impact your health and well-being. 

For instance, while the Stendra 200 mg cost may be lower by weight than the 50 mg pill, buying these pills through a “pharmacy” that sells them without needing a prescription and trying to break up doses later is dangerous and unreliable. Opt for a valid prescription instead.

Still, if the Stendra price is too high for your budget, you do have options for getting Stendra safely, and more affordably:

  • Price shop reputable retailers. Because CVS, Walgreens and other similar retailers in the U.S. can sell prescription medications safely and legally, the Stendra prices at these retailers likely are your best option (unless you want to consider options like, well, us).

  • Look for discounts. Manufacturer coupons are common in the world of medication. See if you can get a discount card or a free coupon that could save you money the first time you buy Stendra, or even regularly.

  • Set price alerts. Look for ways to get notified when drug prices drop. Many online resources help you stay informed if and when an avanafil price drop happens, though those are generally rare.

Choose your chew

Prescription drugs other than Stendra can help with ED. Alternatives you may consider include oral medications like sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, as well as options like alprostadil, a penile injection that helps to improve blood flow and produce an erection. Talk to a health care professional to figure out what might be right for you.

If you’re weighing your options, it’s helpful to know what to expect from ED medications. Often, the risks of these medications include drug interactions with nitrates and alpha blockers and other medications. There’s also the chance of some rare serious side effects like vision loss, hearing loss and priapism (an erection that lasts more than four hours). 

If you experience any of these side effects or think you may be, seek medical attention immediately.

Medication might not be the answer either — if you think your erectile dysfunction could be caused by a psychological issue, you may benefit from taking part in therapy.

In addition to options like medication and therapy, simple changes to your lifestyle, such as keeping yourself physically active, maintaining a healthy body weight, limiting your alcohol consumption, quitting smoking and avoiding illicit drugs, can all help to improve your erections and sexual health. We discuss these methods in more detail in our complete guide to naturally protecting your erections.

Sildenafil citrate

Get hard for 95% cheaper than Viagra

As mentioned, Stendra is the brand name for avanafil, a prescription PDE5 inhibitor that’s used to treat erectile dysfunction. The active ingredient in Stendra, avanafil, works by blocking the effects of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), an enzyme that’s present in the smooth muscle cells of certain blood vessels, including the blood vessels that supply blood to the erectile tissues of your penis.

By doing this, avanafil causes the smooth muscles of the blood vessels to relax. This expands the blood vessels and thus increases blood flow to your penis, making it easier to get and keep an erection during sexual activity.

At $59 each use, Stendra is admittedly more expensive than generic medication options like sildenafil or tadalafil. However, it also offers benefits that other ED medications don’t. 

You can learn more about Stendra and its specific advantages in our Stendra 101 guide, which covers everything from how Stendra works to its efficacy and common side effects, so you can decide if it’s the right option for you. And if it is, you’ll already know how to save. 

10 Sources

  1. Selvin, E., Burnett, A.L. & Platz, E.A. (2007, February 1). Prevalence and Risk Factors for Erectile Dysfunction in the US. The American Journal of Medicine. 120 (2), 151-157. Retrieved from https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(06)00689-9/fulltext
  2. STENDRA™ (avanafil) tablets, for oral use. (2012, April). Retrieved from https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2012/202276s000lbl.pdf
  3. Dhaliwal, A. & Gupta, M. (2021, June 25). PDE5 Inhibitors. StatPearls. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK549843/
  4. Avanafil. (2017, February 15). Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a614010.html
  5. Kotera, J., et al. (2012, August). Avanafil, a potent and highly selective phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor for erectile dysfunction. Journal of Urology. 188 (2), 668-74. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22704456/
  6. VIAGRA® (sildenafil citrate) tablets, for oral use. (2014, March). Retrieved from https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2014/20895s039s042lbl.pdf
  7. CIALIS (tadalafil) tablets, for oral use. (2011, October). Retrieved from https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2011/021368s20s21lbl.pdf
  8. Hellstrom, W.J., et al. (2015, August). Efficacy of Avanafil 15 Minutes after Dosing in Men with Erectile Dysfunction: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study. Journal of Urology. 194 (2), 485-92. Retrieved from https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25591992/
  9. Goldstein, I., et al. (2012, September). Avanafil for the Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction: A Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind Study in Men With Diabetes Mellitus. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 87 (9), 843–852. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3498142/
  10. Treatment for Erectile Dysfunction. (2017, July). Retrieved from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/treatment
Editorial Standards

Hims & Hers has strict sourcing guidelines to ensure our content is accurate and current. We rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We strive to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references. See a mistake? Let us know at [email protected]!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment. Learn more about our editorial standards here.

Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, ALM

Dr. Mike Bohl is a licensed physician, a Medical Advisor at Hims & Hers, and the Director of Scientific & Medical Content at a stealth biotech startup, where he is involved in pharmaceutical drug development. Prior to joining Hims & Hers, Dr. Bohl spent several years working in digital health, focusing on patient education. He has also worked in medical journalism for The Dr. Oz Show (receiving recognition for contributions from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences when the show won Outstanding Informative Talk Show at the 2016–2017 Daytime Emmy® Awards) and at Sharecare. He is a Medical Expert Board Member at Eat This, Not That! and a Board Member at International Veterinary Outreach.

Dr. Bohl obtained his Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine from Brown University, his Master of Public Health from Columbia University, and his Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies—Journalism from Harvard University. He is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Healthcare Leadership at Cornell University. Dr. Bohl trained in internal medicine with a focus on community health at NYU Langone Health.

Dr. Bohl is Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners, Medical Writer Certified by the American Medical Writers Association, a certified Editor in the Life Sciences by the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences, a Certified Personal Trainer and Certified Nutrition Coach by the National Academy of Sports Medicine, and a Board Certified Medical Affairs Specialist by the Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs. He has graduate certificates in Digital Storytelling and Marketing Management & Digital Strategy from Harvard Extension School and certificates in Business Law and Corporate Governance from Cornell Law School.

In addition to his written work, Dr. Bohl has experience creating medical segments for radio and producing patient education videos. He has also spent time conducting orthopedic and biomaterial research at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland and practicing clinically as a general practitioner on international medical aid projects with Medical Ministry International.

Dr. Bohl lives in Manhattan and enjoys biking, resistance training, sailing, scuba diving, skiing, tennis, and traveling. You can find Dr. Bohl on LinkedIn for more information.

Publications

  • Younesi, M., Knapik, D. M., Cumsky, J., Donmez, B. O., He, P., Islam, A., Learn, G., McClellan, P., Bohl, M., Gillespie, R. J., & Akkus, O. (2017). Effects of PDGF-BB delivery from heparinized collagen sutures on the healing of lacerated chicken flexor tendon in vivo. Acta biomaterialia, 63, 200–209. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1742706117305652?via%3Dihub

  • Gebhart, J. J., Weinberg, D. S., Bohl, M. S., & Liu, R. W. (2016). Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip. Bone & joint research, 5(2), 66–72. https://boneandjoint.org.uk/Article/10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000552

  • Gebhart, J. J., Bohl, M. S., Weinberg, D. S., Cooperman, D. R., & Liu, R. W. (2015). Pelvic Incidence and Acetabular Version in Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis. Journal of pediatric orthopedics, 35(6), 565–570. https://journals.lww.com/pedorthopaedics/abstract/2015/09000/pelvic_incidence_and_acetabular_version_in_slipped.5.aspx

  • Islam, A., Bohl, M. S., Tsai, A. G., Younesi, M., Gillespie, R., & Akkus, O. (2015). Biomechanical evaluation of a novel suturing scheme for grafting load-bearing collagen scaffolds for rotator cuff repair. Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), 30(7), 669–675. https://www.clinbiomech.com/article/S0268-0033(15)00143-6/fulltext

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