Better sex, whenever you want.

Start here

What Happens If You Take 2 Viagra In 24 Hours?

Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, ALM

Reviewed by Mike Bohl, MD

Written by Sian Ferguson

Published 05/04/2021

Updated 01/18/2024

Viagra® is a safe and effective treatment for erectile dysfunction. But as the saying goes, you can have too much of a good thing — and Viagra is no exception. Unless a health professional has explicitly told you otherwise, you should not take two Viagra or more within 24 hours. 

There are a couple reasons why you might be wondering if you can double your Viagra dosage. Perhaps your usual dose isn’t working, or perhaps you’re having sex more than once a day (in which case, good for you!). 

Unfortunately though, taking Viagra twice a day can be dangerous, and in some cases, it can lead to some pretty serious side effects. For this reason, you should never, ever take more than your prescribed dosage of Viagra within a 24-hour period. 

The good news? If Viagra isn’t working for you or if you’d like to be able to get an erection more than once a day, there are some alternatives. 

Choose your chew

Add a boost to your sex life with our new chewable formats

Can You Take 2 Viagra Pills at Once?

First, some background on this erectile dysfunction treatment.

Viagra — and its generic, sildenafil — is used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED) and is considered an effective and safe medication for most men with ED. Sildenafil is also the active ingredient in Revatio®, a drug used to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension.

But before you start using Viagra, it’s important to understand what Viagra does, how it works and whether it can help you — and why you should only take two Viagra at the same time if your healthcare provider explicitly says you can. 

Sildenafil citrate, the active ingredient in Viagra, is a PDE5 inhibitor. Phosphodiesterase type 5 is an enzyme that’s found in the smooth muscle cells of blood vessels and helps regulate blood flow. When you take sildenafil, it stops PDE5 from working properly. As a result, blood can flow more easily into the penile tissues, leading to an erection. PDE5 inhibitors can also be used to treat premature ejaculation, although they aren’t specifically FDA approved for that purpose.

For the treatment of erectile dysfunction, you take Viagra shortly before sexual activity — usually, at least 30 minutes to one hour before sexual intercourse.

Clinical trials show that Viagra can be very effective and safe when used in the right dosage. That said, there’s no one “right” Viagra dosage for everyone, and yours may be 25 mg, 50 mg or 100 mg. 

When deciding which dosage to prescribe, your healthcare provider will consider several factors, including:

  • Your medical history and current medical conditions 

  • Any medications you’re currently taking

  • The severity of your erectile dysfunction

Usually, 50 mg is typically the starting dose, which means it’s what a healthcare provider will prescribe for you at first. But if you only have mild erectile dysfunction or if you experience uncomfortable side effects using the 50 mg tablets, they might prescribe a lower dose.  

If your 50 mg dose doesn’t work, you might be wondering if you can take two 50 mg Viagra in one day. No — not unless your healthcare provider says that’s okay. 

But if you’re still experiencing ED with a 50 mg dose, your provider will typically prescribe the 100 mg Viagra pills instead. In rare cases (say, if the 100 mg pills are out of stock), they might suggest taking two 50 mg pills instead. 

But as a general rule, you should never, ever increase your dosage without medical supervision. We’ll cover why in the next section.

It’s especially important not to take two 100 mg tablets. Doses higher than 100 mg aren’t necessarily more effective at treating ED, but they can increase your risk of side effects

Choose your chew

Add a boost to your sex life with our new chewable formats

What Happens If You Take Viagra Twice In One Day?

If you’ve taken two Viagra in one day — accidentally or on purpose — you might experience some intense adverse effects. 

The side effects of Viagra are dose-dependent. This basically means that your risk of side effects increases as your dose increases. Tolerability changes from person to person, so while one person might be able to handle a 100 mg tablet without issues, another person might get side effects from using a 25 mg dose.

The most common side effects are mild and transient, meaning they fade as the medication wears off. But still — they can be pretty unpleasant, especially if you were planning a steamy session with your partner.  

The most common sildenafil side effects include:

  • Headaches 

  • Back pain

  • Muscle aches

  • Nasal congestion

  • Dizziness

  • Facial flushing

  • Indigestion/heartburn

  • Nausea

Typically, you can cope with these side effects by resting and using over-the-counter drugs. They will eventually pass, so they’re not the end of the world — but they’re definitely going to kill the mood.

If you’ve taken two Viagra in one day, you probably don’t need to rush off to the emergency room. But pay attention to your body. 

Seek immediate medical help if you think you’re experiencing one of these rare but serious side effects: 

  • Hearing issues

  • Visual changes (like blurred vision and changes in color vision)

  • Priapism (prolonged, painful erections) 

  • Allergic reactions

  • Hypotension (low blood pressure)

You might also experience adverse effects if you combine Viagra with certain medications — which is another reason why it’s important only to take Viagra if it's prescribed to you. Common drugs that can interact with sildenafil include nitrates, alpha blockers and high blood pressure meds.

While these side effects are uncommon, you’re more likely to experience them if you double your Viagra dose. Increasing your dose could also increase the severity of these side effects.

Choose your chew

Sildenafil Chews

The same active ingredients as Viagra®. Starts working in 30 minutes and lasts up to 6 hours.

Tadalafil Chews

Same active ingredient as Cialis®. Starts working in 1 hour and lasts up to 24 hours.

Vardenafil Hard Mints

Exclusively at Hims, starts working in 15 minutes and lasts up to 6 hours. Same active ingredients as Levitra®.

Alternatives to Taking Viagra Twice in One Day

Taking two Viagra in one day is clearly not a good idea, but if your regular dose isn’t doing the trick, what should you do to manage ED instead? Depending on your reasons for wanting to double your dose, there are some safer alternatives.

Taking Two Viagra To Boost Effectiveness

Is Viagra not working as well as you’d hoped? First, make sure you’re using your sildenafil correctly, and read our guide on how to take Viagra for the best results.

If you want to double your dose to improve its effectiveness, you first need to clear it with a healthcare provider. But — and this is a big but — doubling your dosage isn’t necessarily going to make you doubly as hard. 

Viagra can be pretty effective at treating ED, but it isn’t a silver bullet. Whether sildenafil works or not depends on the cause of your erectile dysfunction.

For example, psychological ED is a thing, which means anxiety, depression, stress or sexual performance anxiety can all affect your sexual performance. In this case, Viagra won’t necessarily help — but in-person or online therapy might make a big difference.

Another potential issue is low sex drive. Even if you take Viagra, you still need sexual stimulation in order to get an erection. If you have a low libido and struggle to get aroused, you might need to chat with a medical expert to explore the causes (which may also be psychological).

If neither of these is the cause of your ED but Viagra still isn’t giving you the results you hoped for, consider asking your healthcare provider if you can try another ED medication. Other PDE5 inhibitors, like Stendra (avanafil), may work better for you.

Taking Two Viagra So That You Can Have Sex Twice

Maybe you’re in a new relationship, and you can’t keep your hands off each other. Maybe you’re planning a romantic weekend away. Or maybe you’re just a super lucky guy. 

No matter why you’re having sex more than once in one day, we’re stoked for you! But there’s a much safer and more convenient alternative to taking two Viagra in a day.

Tadalafil (also known by the brand name Cialis) may be prescribed to use on an as-needed basis. But more importantly for your purposes, it can also be taken as a once-a-day pill that improves your overall erectile function. 

If you’re prescribed the once-a-day, everyday tadalafil dosage, there’s no need to take another pill before round two, allowing for more sexual spontaneity.

Although you can take certain doses of tadalafil once every 24 hours, it’s been nicknamed the “weekend pill” since it can be effective for around 36 hours. Pretty impressive!

Another option is our hard mints chewable ED meds, which combine FDA-approved erectile dysfunction treatments in safe, effective doses. Depending on which hard mint you’re prescribed, you can either use them once a day or on an as-needed basis, as directed by your provider. 

Sildenafil citrate

Get hard for 95% cheaper than Viagra

The Bottom Line on Double Dosing Viagra

Unless a doctor or another healthcare professional specifically advises you to do so, please don’t double your dose of sildenafil. It’s just not worth the risk. 

  • You may experience worse side effects. More Viagra means more risk of adverse events, like headaches and dizziness. Serious side effects, like priapism and vision issues, are also more common with higher Viagra doses.

  • Get medical advice before trying a higher dose. If your current dose of Viagra is not working as you expected, discuss it with your healthcare provider. If it’s safe to do so, they might increase your dosage. 

  • There are many treatment options. If Viagra doesn’t seem to be doing anything for you, there are other erectile dysfunction treatments. Depending on the root cause of your ED, lifestyle changes and therapy might also make a significant difference. 

To learn more about potential ED treatments, check out our blog post on natural tips for treating ED and our guide to the most common erectile dysfunction treatments.

While arming yourself with knowledge is great, it’s no replacement for personalized medical attention. If you need help, we can connect you with a licensed healthcare professional. Book an appointment today to explore your treatment options.  

18 Sources

  1. Cialis (tadalafil). (2018). U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2018/021368s030lbl.pdf
  2. Ciaccio, V., & Di Giacomo, D. (2022). Psychological factors related to impotence as a sexual dysfunction in young men: A literature scan for noteworthy research frameworks. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9326597/
  3. Definition & Facts for Erectile Dysfunction - NIDDK. (2017, July). National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/definition-facts
  4. Dhaliwal, A., & Gupta, M. (2023, April 10). PDE5 Inhibitors. StatPearls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK549843/
  5. Generic Drugs: Questions & Answers. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/drugs/frequently-asked-questions-popular-topics/generic-drugs-questions-answers
  6. Huang, S., & Lie, J. (2013, July). Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors in the management of erectile dysfunction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776492/table/t2-ptj3807407/?report=objectonly.
  7. Li, H., Bai, G., Zhang, X., Shi, B., Liu, D., Jiang, H., Ji, Z., Davis, M. R., Zhu, Z., & Fang, Y. (2017). Effects of two different dosages of sildenafil on patients with erectile dysfunction. American journal of men's health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5675238/
  8. McMurray, J. G., Feldman, R. A., Auerbach, S. M., Deriesthal, H., Wilson, N., & Multicenter Study Group. (2007). Long-term safety and effectiveness of sildenafil citrate in men with erectile dysfunction. Therapeutics and clinical risk management. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2387281/
  9. Mollaioli, D., Ciocca, G., Limoncin, E., Di Sante, S., Gravina, G. L., Carosa, E., Lenzi, A., & Jannini, E. A. F. (2020). Lifestyles and sexuality in men and women: The gender perspective in sexual medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7025405/
  10. Mondaini, N., Ponchietti, R., Muir, G. et al. (2003). Sildenafil does not improve sexual function in men without erectile dysfunction but does reduce the postorgasmic refractory time. https://www.nature.com/articles/3901005
  11. Silberman, M., Stormont, G., Leslie, S. W., et al. (2023). Priapism. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459178/
  12. Smith, B. P., & Babos, M. (2023). Sildenafil. In: StatPearls internet. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK558978/
  13. Sooriyamoorthy, T., & Leslie, S. W. (2023). Erectile Dysfunction. StatPearls. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK562253/
  14. Stendra. (2018). U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2018/202276s018lbl.pdf
  15. Table 2. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) Inhibitors: Product Comparison. (n.d.). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3776492/table/t2-ptj3807407/?report=objectonly
  16. The Food And Drug Administration. (2014). Label: VIAGRA (sildenafil citrate) tablets. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2014/20895s039s042lbl.pdf
  17. The Food And Drug Administration. (2017). VIAGRA® (sildenafil citrate) tablets, for oral use. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2017/020895s048lbl.pdf
  18. Yafi, F. A., Jenkins, L., Albersen, M., Corona, G., Isidori, A. M., Goldfarb, S., Maggi, M., Nelson, C. J., Parish, S., Salonia, A., Tan, R., Mulhall, J. P., & Hellstrom, W. J. (2016). Erectile dysfunction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027992/
Editorial Standards

Hims & Hers has strict sourcing guidelines to ensure our content is accurate and current. We rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We strive to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references. See a mistake? Let us know at [email protected]!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment. Learn more about our editorial standards here.

Mike Bohl, MD

Dr. Mike Bohl is a licensed physician and the Director of Scientific & Medical Content at a stealth biotech startup. Prior to joining Hims & Hers, Dr. Bohl spent several years in digital health focusing on patient education. He has also worked in medical journalism for The Dr. Oz Show and Sharecare and has served on the Medical Expert Board of Eat This, Not That!.

Dr. Bohl obtained his Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine from Brown University, his Master of Public Health from Columbia University, and his Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies—Journalism from Harvard University. He is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Healthcare Leadership at Cornell University. Dr. Bohl trained in internal medicine with a focus on community health at NYU Langone Health.

Dr. Bohl is Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners, Medical Writer Certified by the American Medical Writers Association, a certified Editor in the Life Sciences by the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences, a Certified Personal Trainer and Certified Nutrition Coach by the National Academy of Sports Medicine, and a Board Certified Medical Affairs Specialist by the Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs.

In addition to his written work, Dr. Bohl has experience creating medical segments for radio and producing patient education videos. You can find Dr. Bohl on LinkedIn for more information

Dr. Bohl lives in Manhattan and enjoys biking, resistance training, sailing, scuba diving, skiing, tennis, and traveling. You can find Dr. Bohl on LinkedIn for more information.

Education

  • Bachelor of Arts, Egyptian and Ancient Western Asian Archaeology. Brown University |

  • Doctor of Medicine. |

  • Master of Public Health, General Public Health. |

  • Master of Liberal Arts, Journalism. |

  • Master of Business Administration. | (anticipated 2024)

  • Master of Science, Healthcare Leadership. | (anticipated 2024)

Training

  • NYU Internal Medicine Residency—Brooklyn Community Health Track. |

Certifications

  • Certified in Public Health.

  • Medical Writer Certified.

  • Editor in the Life Sciences.

  • Certified Personal Trainer.

  • Certified Nutrition Coach.

  • Board Certified Medical Affairs Specialist. Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs

  • Digital Storytelling Graduate Certificate.

  • Marketing Management and Digital Strategy Graduate Certificate.

Publications

Read more