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The 5 Best Drinks for Erectile Dysfunction

Kelly Brown MD, MBA

Reviewed by Kelly Brown, MD

Written by Geoffrey C. Whittaker

Published 11/25/2022

Updated 03/04/2024

Watermelon, dark chocolate and bananas may all be great foods to eat to keep your erections strong, but what do you wash them down with? 

As you eat foods that help you get hard, you might be wondering if there are also drinks to help with erectile dysfunction. What about erection tea? Does drinking water help sexually?

Look, it would be great if you could hydrate your way to harder erections, and to a certain extent, you certainly can (more on that soon). But know that if you’re looking for powdered supplements or magic potions, we have bad news: there’s no such thing as an erection drink. 

There are, however, some drinks that you might want to try if you’d like to shift the balance in favor of your sexual health.

While it’s known that certain foods can improve erectile health and help with erectile dysfunction, what drinks for ED can help? Is there a best juice for erectile dysfunction or any other kind of best drink for erectile dysfunction?

While there’s no one best drink for erectile dysfunction, there are some drinks that might give you some erectile benefits.

Pomegranate Juice

Although the evidence isn’t that strong, one 2013 review found drinking pomegranate juice was associated with improvements in ED in several studies.

The most likely reason for this is that the antioxidants in pomegranate juice have been found to enhance nitric oxide levels.

Nitric oxide is a naturally produced molecule that promotes blood flow throughout your vascular system. That makes it important for your physical functioning — including the ability to get and maintain an erection.

Research has found that nitric oxide plays a role in erectile function by relaxing the vascular muscle that supplies your penis with blood when you’re sexually aroused.

 FYI: grape juice has also been found to increase nitric oxide levels, and its flavonoids may benefit vascular health.

While the evidence of the effects of pomegranate juice isn’t very clear, this juice for erectile dysfunction may be worth a try. Or you can try drinking grape juice if you prefer the taste.

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Watermelon Juice

The most refreshing summer beverage for ED is watermelon. We’re calling it now — next year’s summer drink trend.

Look, watermelon is technically a food, but when juiced, it’s more than just a refreshing beverage — it’s one of the best sources of l-citrulline out there. 

L-citrulline is an amino acid noted for its benefits to blood flow and vascular function, which are important parts of physical performance and sexual performance. And yes, we’re pretty sure eating slices of it works fine too.

Beet Juice

Looking for the best juice for erectile dysfunction that can also totally stain your clothes? (Hey, we’re not going to judge). It comes from the beetroot, in our opinion and the opinion of our laundry detergent.

Okay, there’s no strong evidence of beet juice treating ED, but beet juice can increase nitric oxide in your blood, which may help to open up blood vessels — like those around your penis — and promote the blood flow needed for an erection.

Beet juice may also affect blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure (hypertension), foods that are high in nitrates like beets and beet juice can lower your blood pressure.

Milk

There are a few reasons to avoid milk, like lactose intolerance or concerns about hormones, but medical experts wouldn’t suggest avoiding it for ED. 

Drinking milk may help with sexual function, according to a 2003 study. It found that foods with the amino acid L-arginine — such as dairy — can help relax your muscles and improve blood flow. 

Also, kids who grew up in the ‘90s get some nostalgia from a good milk mustache, so… that’s a benefit.

Tea and Coffee

While the world’s most popular sources of natural caffeine are good for your health, we’re not talking about the flavored, canned and bottled drinks you get at gas stations. But if you’re a coffee or tea drinker struggling with ED, you may be in luck.

Caffeine may improve blood flow, according to a 2005 review, as well as relax the smooth muscle that cause and sustain an erection. Another study found that consuming 170mg to 375mg of caffeine per day was enough to significantly reduce reports of ED, compared to those who didn’t consume that much. 

The jury’s out on the benefits of caffeine in improving sexual functioning, but we’ll take our coffee anyway.

Choose your chew

Less Alcohol

You don’t need to read studies on men’s health and sexual desire to know that alcohol isn’t great for you. 

Call it “whiskey dick” or alcohol-induced erectile dysfunction, but either way, drinking affects your central nervous system, sexual arousal and sexual performance.

Oh, and the sugary drinks that are often mixed with alcohol aren’t a part of a healthy lifestyle either — obesity and heart disease are both serious risks of a diet rich in sugars and they increase your chance of developing ED.

Do with this info what you will, but alcohol in moderation is generally thought to be best for everyone and everything — including your sex life.

Some drinks may have an impact on your risk of sexual dysfunction, but unless you become severely dehydrated, what you drink probably isn’t going to be the biggest player in how easy it is for you to get hard. More often than not, ED is a result of better-established reasons for erectile dysfunction, like the psychological causes (stress, depression or performance anxiety) or the physical causes (penis health, testosterone levels or cardiovascular health).

In these cases, other approaches to erectile dysfunction treatment make more sense. We like to break them into two categories:

ED Medications

Erectile dysfunction medications called PDE5 inhibitors work to encourage erections via increased blood flow to your penis. These medications include:

  • Viagra® (sildenafil). Sildenafil, or generic Viagra, provides relief from ED for around four hours.

  • Cialis® (tadalafil). Tadalafil is a long-lasting medication that can provide relief from ED for up to 36 hours.

  • Stendra® (avanafil). A newer ED medication that’s fast-acting, avanafil is less likely to cause certain side effects than older medications. 

  • Levitra® (vardenafil). This oral medication can provide relief from ED for slightly longer than sildenafil.

Our guide to the most common erectile dysfunction treatments talks about these medications, their side effects and more.

Healthy Habits for Mind and Body

Being overweight or obese, drinking excessive alcohol, smoking, having a sedentary lifestyle and using certain types of medication can all increase your ED risk, as well as affect your overall health. Because of this, the best preventative measures are regular exercise, eating a nutritious, well-balanced diet, and quitting smoking and other unhealthy habits.

Another issue that may cause problems is your mental health. Sexual performance anxiety is a fairly well known psychological issue, but anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and negative body issues can all cause psychological ED in otherwise healthy individuals. 

The best solution? Therapy and medication. You can read more about different types of therapy on our blog.

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Like the potion guide in your favorite video games, we can point you to the best drink to last longer in bed and drinks to increase libido, as well as give you the honest answer about whether energy drinks cause ED or if olive oil and lemon juice can treat it.

We also have guides for premature ejaculation, foods that help ED and a deeper dive into water and how it helps your sexual function.

The bottom line is that there’s no magic erectile tonic. Hopefully, however, the health benefits we’ve outlined above give you some ideas of what to sip while you ponder better approaches to improving your sexual functioning. 

  • An extra cup of coffee, grape juice, beet juice or even milk could help with ED or the health conditions that cause it. 

  • More importantly, cutting down on your booze could prevent alcohol-induced ED from taking hold. 

  • If all else fails, there are plenty of science-backed ED treatments approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that a healthcare provider can prescribe.

  • If the cause of your ED is psychological in nature and not related to your physical health, it may be time to schedule a consultation with a mental health professional.

The best treatment, of course, is to talk with your healthcare provider about your symptoms and learn more about the best ED treatments for you. 

Reach out today. 

12 Sources

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.-e). Treatment for erectile dysfunction - NIDDK. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/treatment.
  2. Kroeger, N., Belldegrun, A. S., & Pantuck, A. J. (2013). Pomegranate Extracts in the Management of Men's Urologic Health: Scientific Rationale and Preclinical and Clinical Data. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 2013, 701434. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3622365/.
  3. Miranda Neto, M., Toscano, L. L. T., Tavares, R. L., Toscano, L. T., Padilhas, O. P., Silva, C. S. O. D., Cerqueira, G. S., & Silva, A. S. (2020). Whole purple grape juice increases nitric oxide production after training session in high level beach handball athletes. Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias, 92(4), e20191371. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33206786/.
  4. Kazemirad, H., & Kazerani, H. R. (2018). Nitric oxide plays a pivotal role in cardioprotection induced by pomegranate juice against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Phytotherapy research : PTR, 32(10), 2069–2077. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29998575/.
  5. Burnett A. L. (2006). The role of nitric oxide in erectile dysfunction: implications for medical therapy. Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.), 8(12 Suppl 4), 53–62. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8109295/.
  6. Figueroa, A., Wong, A., Jaime, S. J., & Gonzales, J. U. (2017). Influence of L-citrulline and watermelon supplementation on vascular function and exercise performance. Current opinion in clinical nutrition and metabolic care, 20(1), 92–98. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27749691/.
  7. Domínguez, R., Cuenca, E., Maté-Muñoz, J. L., García-Fernández, P., Serra-Paya, N., Estevan, M. C., Herreros, P. V., & Garnacho-Castaño, M. V. (2017). Effects of Beetroot Juice Supplementation on Cardiorespiratory Endurance in Athletes. A Systematic Review. Nutrients, 9(1), 43. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5856048/.
  8. Lopez, D. S., Wang, R., Tsilidis, K. K., Zhu, H., Daniel, C. R., Sinha, A., & Canfield, S. (2015). Role of Caffeine Intake on Erectile Dysfunction in US Men: Results from NHANES 2001-2004. PloS one, 10(4), e0123547. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4412629/.
  9. Stanislavov, R., & Nikolova, V. (2003). Treatment of erectile dysfunction with pycnogenol and L-arginine. Journal of sex & marital therapy, 29(3), 207–213. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12851125/.
  10. Viigimaa, M., Vlachopoulos, C., Lazaridis, A., & Doumas, M. (2014). Management of erectile dysfunction in hypertension: Tips and tricks. World journal of cardiology, 6(9), 908–915. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4176800/.
  11. Dean, R. C., & Lue, T. F. (2005). Physiology of penile erection and pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction. The Urologic clinics of North America, 32(4), 379–v. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1351051/.
  12. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (n.d.-d). Symptoms & causes of erectile dysfunction - NIDDK. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/symptoms-causes.
Editorial Standards

Hims & Hers has strict sourcing guidelines to ensure our content is accurate and current. We rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We strive to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references. See a mistake? Let us know at [email protected]!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment. Learn more about our editorial standards here.

Kelly Brown MD, MBA
Kelly Brown, MD

Dr. Kelly Brown is a board certified Urologist and fellowship trained in Andrology. She is an accomplished men’s health expert with a robust background in healthcare innovation, clinical medicine, and academic research. Dr. Brown is a founding member of Posterity Health where she is Medical Director and leads strategy and design of their Digital Health Platform, an innovative education and telehealth model for delivering expert male fertility care.

She completed her undergraduate studies at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (go Heels!) with a Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Science and a Minor in Chemistry. She took a position at University of California Los Angeles as a radiologic technologist in the department of Interventional Cardiology, further solidifying her passion for medicine. She also pursued the unique opportunity to lead departmental design and operational development at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, sparking her passion for the business of healthcare.

Dr. Brown then went on to obtain her doctorate in medicine from the prestigious Northwestern University - Feinberg School of Medicine and Masters in Business Administration from Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management, with a concentration in Healthcare Management. During her surgical residency in Urology at University of California San Francisco, she utilized her research year to focus on innovations in telemedicine and then served as chief resident with significant contributions to clinical quality improvement. Dr. Brown then completed her Andrology Fellowship at Medical College of Wisconsin, furthering her expertise in male fertility, microsurgery, and sexual function.

Her dedication to caring for patients with compassion, understanding, as well as a unique ability to make guys instantly comfortable discussing anything from sex to sperm makes her a renowned clinician. In addition, her passion for innovation in healthcare combined with her business acumen makes her a formidable leader in the field of men’s health.

Dr. Brown is an avid adventurer; summiting Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania (twice!) and hiking the incredible Torres del Paine Trek in Patagonia, Chile. She deeply appreciates new challenges and diverse cultures on her travels. She lives in Denver with her husband, two children, and beloved Bernese Mountain Dog. You can find Dr. Brown on LinkedIn for more information.

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