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Can You Take Viagra Daily?

Mike Bohl, MD, MPH, ALM

Reviewed by Mike Bohl, MD

Written by Our Editorial Team

Published 03/22/2022

Updated 03/12/2024

Thankfully for guys with erectile dysfunction, there are erectile dysfunction medications like Viagra, also known by its generic name, sildenafil approved by the Food and Drug Administration for ED. But how you take them matters.

“Can sildenafil be taken daily?” and “Can I take sildenafil every day?” are two good questions. Yes, it is possible to take this medication safely, daily. However, it’s not necessarily the case that it’ll be safe for you, or in your best interest.

So can you take Viagra every day? And if so, what are the benefits of taking Viagra daily?

Read on to find out.

Can you take Viagra daily? Technically, yes, both Viagra and its generic sildenafil can be taken daily. However, a better question is whether it’s actually the right choice for you. If you feel you need to take Viagra daily because you regularly engage in sexual activity, there are other options you could consider instead. Cialis (tadalafil) is a medication that’s FDA approved for ED that lasts for up to 36 hours at a time, so you can take fewer pills and still have relief from ED for a longer period of time. Cialis and its generic, tadalafil, can also be taken daily at lower doses, so you always have some relief from ED. A healthcare provider can discuss these options with you, — whether it’s frequent use of Viagra or choosing a different medication like Cialis.

“Can I take Viagra every day” is a good question to ask, and depending on health details unique to you, the answer may vary. 

If you’re wondering whether it’s possible to take medications for erectile dysfunction every day, you might be surprised to know how many other guys have the same question. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases reports that about 30 million men in the United States are affected by ED, and many of them taking medication have normal, healthy sex lives.

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Spoiler: You should take Viagra exactly as it’s prescribed to you by your healthcare provider. Period. 

That said, if you think you’d like to explore daily Viagra, or the Viagra you’re taking (at the dosage you’re taking it) isn’t working well enough, you should speak to your healthcare provider about your options.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has only approved Viagra dosed for as-needed use. The maximum recommended dosing frequency is once a day. So you can take Viagra daily if you are spacing the doses out by 24 hours, but most people take the medication less frequently than this.

You should never take more than a single dose at once. This can lead to an increased risk of side effects, such as a condition called priapism. This involves getting an erection that lasts longer than four hours, and it can cause permanent damage to your penis. Taking Viagra daily also means you’re at risk of experiencing side effects for more total time — namely, every time you take it and for several hours afterward until the medication is no longer active in your system.

Some internet sources and even a few individual medical experts believe that there are benefits to taking Viagra daily. You’ll find claims that daily Viagra can act as a ward against impotence. Some very new research also shows that taking Viagra may be associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease, particularly in those who take it more frequently. More research needs to be done in this area, though.

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First, know this: sildenafil citrate in all its forms is safe. But, like with anything you take, there are always potential side effects.  For the most part, they are minor. 

However, you should never start taking something new without filling your healthcare provider in on pre-existing medical conditions. 

The most common side effects of sildenafil include: 

  • Headaches

  • Flushing

  • Dyspepsia (indigestion)

  • Abnormal vision 

  • Nasal congestion 

  • Back or muscle pain

  • Nausea

  • Blurred vision

  • Dizziness

  • Rash

You should avoid using certain medications that can interact with Viagra such as alpha-blockers and nitrates.You should even avoid grapefruit when taking Viagra, as it can interact with how Viagra is metabolized. 

If you experience any adverse effects while taking sildenafil (especially serious side effects like vision loss, hearing loss or priapism), contact your healthcare provider immediately.

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Letting erectile dysfunction ruin your sexual activity is not the way to go. Sildenafil, commonly known by its brand name Viagra®, is a medication that is prescribed to help with erectile function.

As for taking sildenafil daily, here are our thoughts:

  • It is intended to be taken as needed with a maximum dose of once per day. Most men will take it less frequently than daily.

  • It is considered safe and effective and, for most people, it causes only mild side effects. 

  • Those side effects could include headaches, dizziness and rashes, among other symptoms. 

  • Some healthcare professionals think this could be a good way to keep your penis healthy.

  • That said, you should never adjust your own dose without discussing it with a healthcare provider first. 

  • If you experience any side effects, it’s a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider.

  • Another option, like Cialis, may be more appropriate if you find yourself taking Viagra every day. 

All PDE5 inhibitors work similarly, but many can be better for certain circumstances and individuals than others. Tadalafil (generic for Cialis), Levitra (and its generic vardenafil) and Stendra (avanafil) all increase blood flow to the penis.

If you’re interested in learning more about taking sildenafil daily, it’s best to consult with a healthcare professional

6 Sources

  1. Definition & Facts for Erectile Dysfunction. (2017, July). Retrieved from https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/erectile-dysfunction/definition-facts
  2. Erection Ejaculation: How It Occurs. (2020, November 27). Retrieved from https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/10036-erection-ejaculation-how-it-occurs
  3. Sildenafil (2018). Medline Plus. Retrieved from https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a699015.html
  4. Food And Drug Administration. (2014). Label: VIAGRA (sildenafil citrate) tablets. https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2014/20895s039s042lbl.pdf
  5. Cherian, J., Rao, A., Thwaini, A., et al (2006, February). Medical and surgical management of priapism. Postgraduate Medical Journal, 82(964): 89-94. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2596691/
  6. Moynihan, R., (2003). Urologist Recommends Daily Viagra to Prevent Impotence. BMJ. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1124975/
Editorial Standards

Hims & Hers has strict sourcing guidelines to ensure our content is accurate and current. We rely on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We strive to use primary sources and refrain from using tertiary references. See a mistake? Let us know at [email protected]!

This article is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The information contained herein is not a substitute for and should never be relied upon for professional medical advice. Always talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of any treatment. Learn more about our editorial standards here.

Mike Bohl, MD

Dr. Mike Bohl is a licensed physician, a Medical Advisor at Hims & Hers, and the Director of Scientific & Medical Content at a stealth biotech startup, where he is involved in pharmaceutical drug development. Prior to joining Hims & Hers, Dr. Bohl spent several years working in digital health, focusing on patient education. He has also worked in medical journalism for The Dr. Oz Show (receiving recognition for contributions from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences when the show won Outstanding Informative Talk Show at the 2016–2017 Daytime Emmy® Awards) and at Sharecare. He is a Medical Expert Board Member at Eat This, Not That! and a Board Member at International Veterinary Outreach.

Dr. Bohl obtained his Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Medicine from Brown University, his Master of Public Health from Columbia University, and his Master of Liberal Arts in Extension Studies—Journalism from Harvard University. He is currently pursuing a Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Healthcare Leadership at Cornell University. Dr. Bohl trained in internal medicine with a focus on community health at NYU Langone Health.

Dr. Bohl is Certified in Public Health by the National Board of Public Health Examiners, Medical Writer Certified by the American Medical Writers Association, a certified Editor in the Life Sciences by the Board of Editors in the Life Sciences, a Certified Personal Trainer and Certified Nutrition Coach by the National Academy of Sports Medicine, and a Board Certified Medical Affairs Specialist by the Accreditation Council for Medical Affairs. He has graduate certificates in Digital Storytelling and Marketing Management & Digital Strategy from Harvard Extension School and certificates in Business Law and Corporate Governance from Cornell Law School.

In addition to his written work, Dr. Bohl has experience creating medical segments for radio and producing patient education videos. He has also spent time conducting orthopedic and biomaterial research at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals of Cleveland and practicing clinically as a general practitioner on international medical aid projects with Medical Ministry International.

Dr. Bohl lives in Manhattan and enjoys biking, resistance training, sailing, scuba diving, skiing, tennis, and traveling. You can find Dr. Bohl on LinkedIn for more information.

Publications

  • Younesi, M., Knapik, D. M., Cumsky, J., Donmez, B. O., He, P., Islam, A., Learn, G., McClellan, P., Bohl, M., Gillespie, R. J., & Akkus, O. (2017). Effects of PDGF-BB delivery from heparinized collagen sutures on the healing of lacerated chicken flexor tendon in vivo. Acta biomaterialia, 63, 200–209. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1742706117305652?via%3Dihub

  • Gebhart, J. J., Weinberg, D. S., Bohl, M. S., & Liu, R. W. (2016). Relationship between pelvic incidence and osteoarthritis of the hip. Bone & joint research, 5(2), 66–72. https://boneandjoint.org.uk/Article/10.1302/2046-3758.52.2000552

  • Gebhart, J. J., Bohl, M. S., Weinberg, D. S., Cooperman, D. R., & Liu, R. W. (2015). Pelvic Incidence and Acetabular Version in Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis. Journal of pediatric orthopedics, 35(6), 565–570. https://journals.lww.com/pedorthopaedics/abstract/2015/09000/pelvic_incidence_and_acetabular_version_in_slipped.5.aspx

  • Islam, A., Bohl, M. S., Tsai, A. G., Younesi, M., Gillespie, R., & Akkus, O. (2015). Biomechanical evaluation of a novel suturing scheme for grafting load-bearing collagen scaffolds for rotator cuff repair. Clinical biomechanics (Bristol, Avon), 30(7), 669–675. https://www.clinbiomech.com/article/S0268-0033(15)00143-6/fulltext

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